Tag Archives: Atoka

Agriculture and Technology Scholarships

The Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation is offering scholarships to students in southern Oklahoma to help them pursue careers in agriculture or technology.

NobleLogo_black_tn

The Noble Foundation conducts plant science research to help farmers and ranchers. See here for a past story about the foundation.

The Sam Noble Scholarship Program helps students looking for degrees from technical institutes or agriculture-related bachelor’s or graduate degrees. The foundation says the agriculture students study everything from economics, communication, agribusiness, and agricultural engineering. As for the technology students, they study computer information systems, photography, and high-voltage electricity.

Here are the details of the scholarship program…

Scholarships for students seeking undergraduate degrees in agriculture-related fields provide $2,500 of support per semester for up to nine semesters, while scholarships for graduate students offer $3,125 per semester for up to five semesters. Applicants must pursue their education at a university awarding baccalaureate or higher degrees through a division or college of agriculture, such as Oklahoma State University, Oklahoma Panhandle State University, Texas Tech University (Lubbock campus) or Texas A&M University (College Station campus).

 Scholarships for those seeking degrees or certifications from technical institutes are for $3,750 per year for up to two years. The applicant must pursue this degree or certification at Oklahoma State University’s Oklahoma City or Okmulgee campus.

 To be eligible to receive a scholarship, a student must plan to attend or be attending a qualifying university or technology training institution during the 2016-2017 academic year. The student must also be a resident of one of the following southern Oklahoma counties: Atoka, Bryan, Carter, Choctaw, Coal, Garvin, Jefferson, Johnston, Love, Marshall, McCurtain, Murray, Pontotoc, Pushmataha or Stephens.

To apply for a scholarship go to this website, www.noble.org/sam-noble-scholarship or send an email to scholarships@noble.org.

The applications must be completed by Feb. 15, 2016.

 

What’s a Graptolite?

Remember that Golden Spike? (Click here or scroll down one story.) It marks a boundary between two geologic time spans. In a nutshell, it’s where and when (geologically speaking) a  species makes its debut in the geologic record.
The Oklahoma spike is where Diplacanthograptus caudatus was found. It was a small aquatic animal called a Graptolite that floated around thanks to ocean currents.
Kyle Hartshorn with Dry Dredgers sent along some pictures of Graptolites that were found in Oklahoma. They’re tiny and look like pencil marks in the rock. Hartshorn told me, “Graptolites came in a variety of shapes: long and thin, short and wide, wishbone shaped, spiraled, and more.  There were quite a few forms at the places we went.”
Courtesy: Kyle Hartshorn

Courtesy: Kyle Hartshorn

Courtesy: Kyle Hartshorn

Courtesy: Kyle Hartshorn

Courtesy: Kyle Hartshorn

Courtesy: Kyle Hartshorn

This pic below is of a conodont. It was an small creature that kind of looked like an eel. The conodont below is the yellow-orange speck inside the circle. That circle is about the size of a dime and was drawn around the fossil to help spot it. Conodonts are extremely hard to spot with the naked eye.

Courtesy: Kyle Hartshorn

Courtesy: Kyle Hartshorn

These images are why I can’t help but examine rocks when I’m outside. You never know what you’re going to find, fossils can be all shapes and sizes!!

A Golden Spike in Oklahoma Marks the Spot

A Golden Spike in Oklahoma marks a geologic boundary that has the attention of scientists across the world. The picture below shows what’s called the Katian Golden Spike. It’s been placed near Atoka (about 45 miles southeast southwest of McAlester).

The Katian Golden Spike near Atoka. Courtesy: Dry Dredgers

The Katian Golden Spike near Atoka. Courtesy: Dry Dredgers

So what’s up with a big gold spike being hammered into the rocks? Well, long story short- it marks the beginning of a span of geologic time. This particular spike represents the start of the Upper Ordovician Katian Stage. The Ordovician Period is a span of time that lasted from about 485-million years ago to 443-million years ago. The Katian Stage was the second to last stage of the Ordovician. It lasted about 8-million years.

The spike marks a Global Boundary Stratotype Section and Point or GSSP. The location for a spike is determined by the first appearance of a particular species in the geologic record. In the case of the Katian Golden Spike, it marks the first place where Diplacanthograptus caudatus was found…a small aquatic animal that just floated around.

Kyle Hartshorn is with Dry Dredgers, “the oldest continuously-operating fossil club in North America”. He was also part of a group that recently toured Oklahoma’s geology and placed the spike in Atoka. He says these kinds of fossils look like little zippers or feathers, “These floating colonial animals were widely distributed by ocean currents, making them excellent tools for stratigraphic correlation.  Other wide-ranging planktonic fossils are also found at the site, including conodonts (teeth-like structures from tiny lamprey-like primitive fish) and chitinozoans (little sac-shaped fossils of unknown origin).”

The placement of a Golden Spike is mostly ceremonial, according to Hartshorn, but it does help scientists who do research there in the future. There are Golden Spikes placed around the world but only six , including the Katian Spike in Atoka, are in the United States.