Tag Archives: theropod

Another New Dino

I’ve been busy working on a project but there’s always time to talk about the latest dinosaur find. That illustration above is Yi qi. It was found in China and dates back to 160 million years ago.

It’s unique because it’s a theropod that has wings similar to a bat. You can see its long bones in the hand region used to support the wing membrane.

Dr. Jerry Coyne has a great write-up on it on his blog at Why Evolution is True. (Which is also the name of his outstanding book on evolution. It’s a great read to help you get a better understanding of evolution.)

This is what I love about science. It seems everyday a new discovery is made which brings up more and more questions, which spurs more and more research.

New Dinosaur Discovered

Illustration by Gabriel Lio

Illustration by Gabriel Lio

A new dinosaur has been discovered and it has paleontologists excited because it belongs to a lineage of herbivores that no one knew existed. It’s called Chilesaurus diegosuareziIts name comes from the country where it was found, combined with the name of the seven year old boy who discovered it.

Chilesaurus was a theropod but, unlike most other theropods, it was a plant eater. It’s also unusual because it had characteristics of other dinosaurs but it belonged to a separate group of dinos. Martin Ezcurra is one of the scientists who worked on the project. He describes Chilesaurus like this, “Its skull and neck look like those of primitive long-necked dinosaurs like Plateosaurus; the vertebrae resemble those of primitive meat-eating theropods such as Dilophosaurus; the pelvis is very similar to that of ornithischian dinosaurs such as Iguanodon; and the hand has only two well-developed fingers as in Tyranosaurus Rex, but with a longer arm.” 

Click here to read more of Ezcurra’s description of the ID process. This article has a great picture of the Chilesaurus’ fossilized teeth.

Brian Switek has a fantastic article on the discovery here.

And here’s a writeup from National Geographic.