Tag Archives: Tulsa

Keystone Ancient Forest

The Keystone Ancient Forest is one of the gems of northeastern Oklahoma. The forest is located in Sand Springs and is home to trees that are hundreds of years old. It’s made up of cross timbers which are some of the toughest trees in existence which is why it’s never been developed.

The forest shows what Oklahoma (or at least the Sand Springs area) looked like well before civilization began exploring it.

It’s a great place to go for a walk and take a step back in time but it does have limited hours and pets are not allowed.

It’s only open on select days throughout the month. For more information on the Forest click here for the city of Sand Springs.

 

Science Research in Oklahoma

There is so much science happening right under our noses here in eastern Oklahoma. The OSU Center for Health Sciences is just one example. You’ll find research into biomedical and forensic science, healthcare, medicine, and ,my personal favorite, paleontology.

The cool thing is OSU-CHS has a fantastic resource to help you stay on top of what they’re doing. They call it the Research Spotlight. There are videos and information all on kinds of topics. The video below is one example of the research taking place right here in Tulsa!

 

 

Adventures on Turkey Mountain

Turkey Mountain is a popular place to hike, walk, or ride a bike. Thousands of people go there every year but I wonder how many have stopped to think about the science that’s all around them.

Dr. Stanley Rice recently gave me a personal science tour of Turkey Mountain. He showed me tree fossils and explained that Turkey Mountain is the only place in Oklahoma where a certain oak tree grows. This just shows that science is everywhere. It’s also why you’ll often find me checking out rocks, I’m looking for fossils and evidence of ancient Earth.

This is important-If you find fossils on Turkey Mountain please do not remove them.

(Dr. Rice has been featured before on SIO…click here to see his impersonation of Charles Darwin.)

 

Tools for Digging up Dinos

Ever wonder what tools paleontologists use for digging up dinos? Wonder no more. Here’s the second video from my trip to the Oklahoma Panhandle. (Here’s the first.) It was part of the ExplorOlogy program sponsored by the Sam Noble Museum. We went to Kenton, OK and Black Mesa. It’s home to a ton of fossils from about 150 million years ago.

Dr. Lindsey Yann of the OSU Center for Health Sciences explains the main kinds of tools they use to dig up those fossils and why it’s important to study Oklahoma’s past.

Dr. Yann is the volunteer coordinator for the Vertebrate Paleontology lab in Tulsa. It’s a great place to volunteer if you want to see fossils up close but can’t make it to the Panhandle.

Thanks again to the scientists at the Sam Noble Museum and the OSU Center for Health Sciences for inviting me on this trip.

Rush in Tulsa

It’s a great week here in Tulsa, America…at least for fans of the rock band Rush. I’ve been a lifelong fan of this amazing trio. Their lyrics, their musicality, and their ability to stay together for more than 40 years is inspirational.

They have a number of songs with a science themes…Cygnus X 1, Countdown, and 2112 (okay, so that’s more science-fiction).

But my favorite is Natural Science. It’s a doozy at more than nine minutes. It’s about not forgetting the natural world despite all of our modern technology. The song shows off Alex, Geddy, and Neil’s musical ability with three different movements and several odd time signatures. Enjoy.

Earthquakes and Oklahoma

Oklahoma, we need to talk. We have an earthquake problem and here’s the thing, we think we know why. More and more reports are coming out showing it’s connected to the disposal of waste water from oil and gas wells.

Oil and gas are deeply tied to this state and I’m not in favor damaging the industry but we simply have to do something. Instead, our state leaders think laws prohibiting local officials from doing what they think is best for their own community is the way to go. Besides just being short-sighted it’s a slap in the face to Oklahomans. Now The Daily Show has taken notice with Jon Stewart appropriately saying, “What the f#&k Oklahoma?”

Summer of Science

How about a summer of science for your high schooler (or 8th grader)?!?! OK Higher Ed is offering a fantastic opportunity for students who will be in 8th-12th grade next year. It’s called the Summer Academies.

A total of 26 academies will be held at 17 college campuses across the state throughout the summer.  Topics include biology, engineering, math, aeronautics, meteorology…you know, all the STEM stuff. Best of all, it’s FREE!!!

Check out these quotes from former academy attendees courtesy of OKMath.

“No field of study has started a fire within me like architecture and interior design has. Your enthusiasm for my ideas and designs was new and exciting for me.”

“This is the best thing I will ever do this whole entire summer.”

“College doesn’t seem as unimaginable as before. I will definitely be going to college.”

OKMath also reports, “a greater percentage of Summer Academies students go to college immediately after high school than compared to other students.” Also, “Summer Academies students earn degrees at a higher rate than other students.”

Click here to register and see a full list of academies being offered. You can also call 1-800-858-1840 for more information.

And remember, it’s FREE!!

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How you can help find Fossils

If you’ve ever wanted to work with fossils and help paleontologists make new discoveries this is the story for you. The Vertebrate Paleontology lab at the OSU Center for Health Sciences in Tulsa needs volunteers. You don’t need to have any experience, just a love for science. You’ll also get to work with Dr. Anne Weil.

Volunteers work Wednesday-Friday, 9 to 5 sifting through rock and soil looking for fossils.

Click here for a more information, as well as how to get in touch with the volunteer coordinator.

This Scientist is OK- Dr. Anne Weil

Dr. Anne Weil is a vertebrate paleontologist at the OSU Center for Health Sciences in Tulsa. Her specialty is looking at a “lost branch of mammalia” called multituberculates. They lived roughly 180 to 30 million years ago. Here’s an example.

She started college wanting to be a novelist but soon found herself taking geology and paleontology courses. Next thing you know she’s paleontologist researching fossilized mammal teeth.

She’s an OK scientist.

Bedbugs, Bats, and Cavemen

News On 6 in Tulsa had an interesting story about research being done on the evolution of bedbugs. It says Dr. Warren Booth, a University of Tulsa biology professor, has evidence that bedbugs first evolved to feed off bats in caves. Eventually, early humans lived in the caves and some bedbugs branched off to feed on the humans. The story refers to the early humans as cavemen and says bedbug evolution took place about 250,000 years ago. That would mean the “cavemen” could be Homo erectus, Homo heidelbergensis, or even Neanderthals.

What I think is cool is how this story punctuates why it’s important to study evolution. Here’s a quote from the story, “We need to understand the evolutionary history of the organisms before we can bring it right down to what’s happening here,” said Booth. I’ve heard too many people question why we should study evolution. Dr. Booth says it right there, basically you have to know where you’ve been before you know where to go.

Thank you News On 6 for highlighting an Oklahoma scientist and the important research being done right here.